Best of the visualisation web… April 2012 (part 2)

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. If you follow me on Twitter you will see many of these items shared as soon as I find them.

Here’s part one of the latest collection from April 2012 (see part one):

Vis4.net | Rendering high resolution maps in Kartograph | Mapping Tutorial

Interactives | Edward Segel: interactive features should scream interactivity | Video

FastCo Design | ‘Infographic Turns Boring Corporate Workflow Into Buzzing Metropolis’ | Illustration

InfograhpicsNews | Profile of the New York Times’ experiment with gamification | Article

Ben Willers | Looking at alternatives methods of stacking data in visualisation | Methods

After The Flood | Smart videographic about the Titantic for the BBC History website | Video

Visual.ly | ‘Dear NASA: No More Rainbow Color Scales, Please’ | Article

Visualopolis | Alberto Cairo asks ‘Why is infographic plagiarism so common?’ | Article

New York Times | ‘Connecting Music and Gesture’ – Beautiful animated work to capture the movement of Alan Gilbert, music director of the New York Philharmonic | Animation

Wall Street Journal | ‘Making Data Beautiful’ – How the most inspiring new art is visualized information | Article

Guardian | Worth learning from, ‘A manifesto for the simple scribe – my 25 commandments for journalists’ | Article

XKCD | Illustrated work to explain the depths of various lakes and oceans | Visualisation

Eager Eyes | Robert Kosara explores what it means to inform | Article

FastCo Design | How GM Is Saving Cash Using Legos As A Data Viz Tool | Article

Google Think Quarterly | ‘Data Visions’ – The explosion of data is inspiring a new generation of digital artists determined to reshape the way we see the world… | Article

New York Times | Setting the stage for the Titanic tragedy | Infographic

Michael Babwahsingh | ‘Stalking the Viz-Elephant’ – getting deeper in to the discussions of important visualisation issues | Article

Forbes | Tim O’Reilly on the Future of Location: “The Guy with the Most Data Wins” | Article

Wired | Want to work at Google? Answer these questions | Artticle

Letters of Note | David Ogilvy’s letter that declares how he is a ‘lousy copywriter’ | Article

Density Design | The many ways of visualising Twitter | Collections

This is Visual | The Faces of the Champions League semi-finalists | Visualisation

Chartsnthings | Process narrative for the New York Times’ visualisation about Rick Santorum’s campaign | Process Narrative

Wired | Adidas brings you the first ‘smart’ football match | Article

Google Research | Announcing developments to the Google Fusion Tables features | Article

Guardian | Pioneering German visualisation monitors train delays in real time | Interactive Visualisation

Visual.ly | How to produce motion graphics | Tutorial

Guardian | ‘How can we get our map colours right? How open journalism helped us get better’ | Article

Derek Watkins | ‘A squinty-eyed look at population densities’ | Interactive Visualisation

 


Presenting the top five most popular posts on Visualising Data during April:

1. Best of the visualisation web… March 2012 (part 1) – April 11th, 2012

2. Best of the visualisation web… March 2012 (part 2) – April 11th, 2012

3. Newly launched – The Miso Project – April 20th, 2012

4. Visual.ly article “10 things you can learn from NYT data visualisations” – April 2nd, 2012

5. Best of the visualisation web… February 2012 (part 1) – April 4th, 2012

2 Comments

[...] data visualisatie. Zo maakt hij regelmatig overzichten van de artikelen die hem zijn opgevallen in een bepaalde maand. Ook geeft hij in zijn sectie Resources een uitgebreid overzicht van data visualisatie software en [...]

[...] texts for my journey through the subject. Also, on a monthly basis, I collate and curate the best of the visualisation web. This is the online content published or discovered during the previous calendar month which I [...]