Best of the visualisation web… December 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from December 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

Maarten Lambrechts | ‘The list of 2017 visualization lists’ – Saving me about 30 entries in this month’s roundup, here’s Maarten’s compilation of all the major end of year visualisation lists, featuring collections of work from the array of media graphic teams and other prominent visualisation folks

Huffington Post | ‘Voucher Schools Championed By Betsy DeVos Can Teach Whatever They Want. Turns Out They Teach Lies.’

New York Times | ‘We Asked 615 Men About How They Conduct Themselves at Work’

AFP | ‘Stray Bullets: Violence and broken lives in Rio’

New York Times | ‘The Year From Above’

Twitter | ‘National Geographic Magazine has published its cover number 1500’, here they all are in gif form

Urban Demographics | Useful. ‘Chart of the Day: socket patterns worldwide’

New York Times | ‘Among the Tax Bill’s Biggest Losers: High-Income, Blue State Taxpayers’

FT | ‘Banks set to move fewer than 4,600 City jobs over Brexit’

Twitter | ‘Little Saturday morning abstract dataviz project, visualising airports using flightradar24 flight path data for last Tuesday.’

Axios | ‘Wildfires are burning longer and hotter each year’

Medium | Yannick Assogba’s ‘Data visualization favorites from 2017’

Everyday Dashboards | ‘Real use cases of Tableau. Real dashboards made by real users like you.’

The Guardian | ‘Follow that stork! How animals move through cities – mapped’

New York Times | ‘Trump’s Lies vs. Obama’s Lies’

Morgenpost | ‘Where women earn more than men’

Dueling Data | ‘3 Types of Data Visualizations’

The Guardian | ‘Bussed out: How America moves its homeless’

Washington Post | ‘Will your taxes go up or down in 2018 under the new tax bill?’

Bloomberg | ‘How the Populist Right Is Redrawing the Map of Europe’

New York Times | ‘How the ‘Small-Business Tax Cut’ Would Also Be a Tax Cut for the Wealthy’

Reuters | ‘The Rohingya Crisis: Life in the camps’

Twitter | ‘All my runs (2011-2017) plotted from @Strava data’

Huffington Post | There’s all sorts to unpack in this! ‘Why millennials are facing the scariest financial future of any generation since the Great Depression.’

WSJ | ‘Millions of People Post Comments on Federal Regulations. Many Are Fake.’

Twitter | ‘More than 3 million Tweets about the #MeToo movement. Explore how it spread on Twitter in its first week with this visualization of the volume & top Tweets.’

Jim Vallandingham | ‘Multivariate Map Collection’

Our World in Data | ‘Natural Catastrophes’

SCMP | ‘Getting away from work in 2018’

Creative New Zealand | ‘Our Year in Review: Creative New Zealand’

The Guardian | ‘Read this before you have a baby (especially if you’re a woman)’

Twitter | ‘The Super moon rising over Nairobi, Kenya’

ESRI | ‘Seismic Illumination: Pacific Rim Earthquakes as the Echo of A Planetary Process’

Reuters | Character appearances in Star Wars movies

FT | ‘Bregrets? Why Britain has had few over Europe’

Vox | ‘A series of six documentaries – the human stories behind lines on a map’

Washington Post | ‘Can Democrats win back the House in 2018? It’ll be tough.’

New York Times | ‘The Reckoning: Women and power in the workplace’

SCMP | ‘Who’s favourite to survive round one of the World Cup?’

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

Datawrapper | ‘”The key to a good data story is the story itself”‘

Road To Larissa | ‘2017 Chart Diary’

Medium | ‘A short story about a bot, colors, and optimism, hopefully!’

Boston Globe | ‘At Google in Cambridge, she’s working ‘to invent the future” – nice interview with Fernanda Viégas

FT | ‘Design secrets behind the FT’s best charts of the year’

Twitter | ‘The fact that not everything you’d like to know is shown in one single graph doesn’t make it a bad graph though’

Quartz | ‘How I, the New York Times election needle, turned failure into my greatest advantage’

Interview Magazine | ‘The designer using data to tackle mass incarceration’

Medium | ‘The State of The Pudding, 2018’

Richmond | ‘Renewing Inequality: Urban Renewal, Family Displacements, and Race 1955-1966’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

Mike Vizneros | Great visuals and really nice project write-up by Mike: ‘Art For Earth’s Sake’

Learno | Some excellent courses developed by Maarten Lambrechts including ‘Mapping for Journalists’ and ‘Charting Tools for the Newsroom’

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

Rock the VizComm | ‘Charting the Chartists: A 2016 Survey of Data Visualization Professionals’

Reddit | ‘DataIsBeautiful Battles: Create, compete, and see if you can win Reddit gold in our monthly DataViz competition!’

Amazon | New Book: ‘The Zoomable Universe: An Epic Tour Through Cosmic Scale, from Almost Everything to Nearly Nothing’ by Caleb Scharf and illustrated by Ron Miller

Observable | New tool: ‘Observable is a better way to code. Discover insights faster and communicate more effectively with interactive notebooks for data analysis, visualization, and exploration.’

p5PlayGround | New tool: ‘p5.playground: an Interactive Programming Tool for p5.js (in progress)’

Amazon | New Book: ‘Stats, Records & Rock ‘N’ Roll’ by by Daniel Tatarsky and‎ Ian Preece

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

The Guardian | ‘American reams: why a ‘paperless world’ still hasn’t happened’

Better Explained | ‘Colorized Math Equations’

Deven Wisner | ‘For the consultants and consultants-to-be: expert advice.’

Justin O’Beirne | ‘How far ahead of Apple Maps is Google Maps?’

NewsCo Shift | ‘My Internet Mea Culpa. I’m sorry I was wrong. We all were.’

Twitter | There’s has been a lot of discussion about the appropriate this ‘To the 53 people who’ve watched A Christmas Prince every day for the past 18 days: Who hurt you?’

Open Railway Map | ‘A detailed online map of the world’s railway infrastructure, built on OpenStreetMap data’

Twitter | ‘This has to be the most incredible stat I’ve seen this year’

BBC | ‘Person of the Year: Time magazine explains mystery arm’

Washington Post | ‘What’s a Wendy’s doing there? The story of Washington’s weirdest traffic circle.’

Medium | ‘Why does it always rain on me?’

10 significant visualisation developments: July to December 2017

To mark each mid-year and end-of-year milestone I take a reflective glance over the previous 6-month period in the data visualisation field and compile a collection of some of the most significant developments. These are the main projects, events, new sites, trends, personalities and general observations that have struck me as being important to help further the development of this field or are things I simply liked a great deal. Here’s the full compilation of all my collections.

Earlier last year I published a collection for the first 6 months of 2017 and now I’d like to reflect on the second 6 months. I look forward to hearing from you with suggestions for the developments you believe have been most significant.

And so, as ever, in no particular order…

1. Datawrapper

We begin the list with a few mentions for visualisation tools/applications. Datawrapper has been around for several years, offering a very neat method for quickly creating charts and maps online. However, it feels like these past few months of 2017 will be looked back on as something of a watershed. With the tool continuing to mature substantially, especially in the breadth of chart types and customisations that are possible, the recent inspired appointments of stellar talents Lisa Charlotte Rost and Gregor Aisch to the team show things are moving forward in a very exciting direction. Tool aside, let me recommend you find a way to add Lisa’s excellent and prolific blog posting to whatever feed mechanism you follow these things through.

2. Project Lincoln

This video is from the Adobe MAX 2017 event and offers a ‘sneak peak’ presentation from Bernard Kerr about a tool he has been working on, known for now as Project Lincoln. As I wrote back in October, I was very fortunate have the chance to see a preview of this tool early in 2017 and, should it be backed by Adobe, it looks like a really exciting development for visualisation designers. The fact it is being showcased at this event suggests progress is positive so fingers-crossed.

3. Bee-swarm charts

This is not a new plot – it seems there have been R packages for several years and Nathan did this tutorial post over a year ago – but in terms of observing trends I feel the past half year has seen a lot of growth in the deployment of this technique (examples: 1, 2, 3, 4). They are deployed when you want to show the distribution of values in a dataset but in a way that maintains the resolution of every data point rather than displaying aggregated bins (histogram) or potentially abstract summary statistics (box-and-whiskers plot).

4. How do you draw a circle?

Apart from exhibiting a super slick set of visuals across a wonderfully composed and deeply insightful report, this work resonated with me simply as somebody who has always been intrigued by this most seemingly basic of things – the technique of drawing a circle. I was amazed at the range and diversity of methods taken by people from across the globe.

5. Peak Spotting

Based on a collaboration between superstars Studio NAND, Moritz Stefaner, Stephan Thiel, Christian Laesser et al, Peak Spotting isn’t just a particularly elegant visualisation combining a range of sophisticated visual techniques but, perhaps more importantly, it is also a practical tool created for Deutsche Bahn to help “yield and capacity managers to identify potential bottlenecks early on and react through price management, communications or logistic solution”. Wonderful to see such high-calibre work being created for the purpose of valuable utility.

6. Flowing Data

2017 marked 10 years of Nathan running the ever-superb Flowing Data and I feel it is really important to not only celebrate his reaching this milestone but to thank him for his relentlessly prolific profiling of the latest visualisation works and techniques, as well as his excellent tutorials and own visual explorations. Here’s to the next 10 years, Nathan!

7. Twitter

For many years now Twitter has been firmly established as the primary social media platform for posting, discovering and interacting with folks in data visualisation. Pretty much everyone of note is on there and is very active with it. Personally speaking it has been a tremendously important method for developing ones profile over several years. During the past two years, though, it is fair to say that the political landscape has altered the focus of conversation and attention. It is clear just looking at one’s timeline how visualisation is almost a secondary subject, which is entirely understandable. However, through the vaccuum of leadership from the ‘leaders’ of Twitter, failing to provide responsible custodianship in the face of growing volumes of extremist voices (human or otherwise), as people become exposed to an increasingly poisonous atmosphere beyond the immediate data visualisation bubble, there has been a growing sense that a tipping point may be imminent. Increasing numbers of people are voicing intent to leave Twitter or seeking new platforms to conduct their interactions elsewhere. Whether this elsewhere is Facebook or Mastodon, which has been tip-toeing slowly into the consciousness, remains unclear. It may not even happen. However, I do feel the visualisation-twitter world has changed and we could be reaching something of a junction in how this field exists and networks online.

8. Open Access VIS

Steve Haroz’s work to create an accessible platform offering ‘a collection of open access visualization research papers, material, and data’ is a very useful and very appreciated development, especially for those outside of the academic communities with limited access to these important materials and/or those who don’t have the patience to collect and organise themselves.

9. Dear How To

There have been several projects inspired by and emulating the essence of the rightly, highly celebrated ‘Dear Data‘ project, but ‘Dear How to‘ is perhaps my favourite. Taking a direction that goes beyond visualisation in a pure sense and more into explanation diagrams/information design, this project is based on a year of hand-drawn instructions. Each week Sol, Josefina and Tomoko (designers who met at the MA Information Design at Reading University) draw instructions on a blank postcard and sends it in turn to one or the other with the primary rule being ‘no text allowed!’.

10. What’s Going On in This Graph?

This is a new monthly feature from the New York Times, partnering with the American Statistical Association (ASA), motivated by a recognition of the importance, as a key 21st-century skill, of ‘teaching students how to read, interpret and question graphs, maps and charts’. Each month they publish a graph and invite people to consider and discuss three things: 1) What do you notice? 2) What do you wonder? 3) What’s going on in this graph?. Wonderful to see such prominent attention being placed on readers and their responses to and abilities to consume different types of visual portrayals.

Special mentions…

Here are the other highlights from the second half of 2016 that deserve a special mention:

The longest running study on wild elephants | The Amboseli Trust for Elephants has been studying the elephants of Amboseli, Kenya since 1972 following the lives of more than 3200 individuals born into 68 families and this interactive project cleverly shows the development of the Amboseli study population over time.

Face of a Nation | A very clever concept developed by Güney Soykan, this portfolio of images creates “portraits of different nations based on [images of] their leaders from the past 50 years”.

Font Map | This project offers an interactive map to explore over 750 fonts, formed by artificial intelligence used to surface new characteristics, relationships and means of organisation

Flourish Studio | Included ‘only’ in the special mentions because I’ve not yet had chance to find time to play but I’m very interested to see the capabilities of this tool from the talented folks at Kiln, with my appetite only whetted by this twitter thread.

German Election Visuals | There was some stunning visualisation work created before, during and since the German elections and this is a great compilation

Hurricane Visuals | Similarly, there were some very innovative visuals produced to cover the devastating US Hurricanes and this collection provides a nice snapshot

Shadow Peace | Neil Halloran’s excellent sequel to ‘The Fallen of World War II’, ‘The Shadow Peace’ is a “web series that combines data-visualization and cinematic storytelling to explore the driving factors of war and peace”.

Best of the visualisation web… November 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from November 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

ProPublica | ‘Bombs in Your Backyard’

Gramener | ‘US Senator Voting Patterns’

FlowingData | ‘Constructed Career Paths from Job Switching Data’

Tableau Public | ‘MLB Pitcher Heatmaps’

Spotify | ‘Dataviz: A ‘Joy Plot’ about Joy Division’

NZZ | ‘Ten election promises of Trump in the interim balance’ (Translated)

New York Times | ‘Every Tax Cut and Tax Increase in the House G.O.P. Bill and What It Would Cost’

Slow Journalism | ‘Alan Partridge infographic: Tracking the trials and tribulations of Norwich’s favourite son.’

Datawrapper | ‘Weekly Chart: I’m surrounded by old people’

Interactive Things | ‘Violence Info: Global knowledge platform about violence prevention for the World Health Organization’

Twitter | ‘I analyzed how the 35k followers of @visualisingdata are connected with each other and tried to put labels on the different groups.’

ABC | ‘When will be a good time for the US to act on gun control?’

New York Times | ‘Here’s How Far the World Is From Meeting Its Climate Goals’

Twitter | ‘A look at @pewresearch’s work on US political typologies, highlighting the issues that divide an increasingly polarised electorate ‘

Washington Post | ‘The math of mass shootings in America’

Tableau Public | ‘When Life gets chaotic’

Mapmaker | ‘I’m a geographer, urban planner, and geospatial analyst. I make maps for making better plans, decisions, and places.’

Rain | A fascinating visual arrangement of piece of music from Ukraine, presented by Obiymy Doschu

BBC | ‘Nasa timelapse paints ‘most complete picture of life’ to date’

Guardian | ‘The Vortex: Why we are all to blame for the nightmare of online debate’

Axios | ‘People in highly digitized jobs earn more, report finds’

Washington Post | ‘How Virginia went from Blue to Red and Back Again’

New York Times | ‘The Words Men and Women Use When They Write About Love’

Article 19 | ‘The expression agenda report’

AIDSVu | ‘AIDSVu maps allow users to view HIV alongside social determinants of health, including poverty, median household income and education.’

Guardian | ‘The three-degree world: the cities that will be drowned by global warming’

CNN | ‘There is a wave of Republicans leaving Congress’

John Grimwade | ‘Visual Conceit: Creative visual solutions by Adonis Durado.’

New York Times | ‘Trump Is Rapidly Reshaping the Judiciary. Here’s How.’

Strava | ‘The Global Heatmap, Now 6x Hotter’

Mapbox | ‘Tracing Maria’s Wake’

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

YouTube | TEDxGlasgow ‘2037 – Who’s leading? Who’s following’

Data Driven Journalism | ‘A data journalist’s microguide to environmental data’

ABC | ‘Australian research ‘has a Daversity problem’: Analysis shows too many men work mostly with other men’

Washington Post | ‘Ancient data, modern math and the hunt for 11 lost cities of the bronze age’

PolicyViz | ‘Choosing Map Bins’

Programming Design Systems | ‘Colour schemes’

Creative Review | ‘Designing graphics for BBC News’

Medium | ‘From Data Visualization to Interactive Data Analysis’

Guardian | ‘Full results of Australia’s vote for same-sex marriage, electorate by electorate – interactive’

Google | ‘Getting hyper-local: Mapping street-level air quality across California’

Storybench | ‘How a design studio and an advocacy group developed a data-driven navigator for gun legislation’

Lisa Charlotte Rost | ‘That Frustrating Thing About Creating Data Vis in Newsrooms’

Medium | ‘Picturing the Great Migration’

GIJC | ‘Seven Trends in Data Visualization’

Medium | ‘What does data journalism look like today? A 10-step guide’

PolicyViz | ‘Remaking an OECD Stacked Bar Chart’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

Medium | ‘Behind the scenes: How we came up with our visualizations of Google search interest around the German elections’

Storybench | ‘Data Literacy & Data Visualization for Community Resilience’

FT | ‘Data visualisation mistakes — and how to avoid them’

Stats Maps ‘n Pix | ‘A Land Cover Atlas of the UK’

Visualization Universe | ‘What types of visualization do we search for and why? What tools and books influence our decisions?’

Datawrapper | ‘What Questions to Ask When Creating Charts’

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

Nieman Lab | ‘“Instagram for data”: Grafiti wants to make it easier to create and share data visualizations on smartphones’

Storytelling With Data | ‘Introducing the SWD podcast’

IIBA | ‘Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards 2017 – The Winners’

Planet | ‘At Planet, we’ve been pursuing Mission 1: to image the entire Earth’s landmass every day. I couldn’t be more excited to announce that we have achieved our founding mission’

Tableau | ‘Now in beta: Visual data prep with Project Maestro’

Twitter | John Burn-Murdoch wins the ‘Peston’ programme’s ‘Geek of the Week’ award

Small Multiples | Lovely redesigned site exhibiting their great portfolio of work

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

Bernhard Lang | ‘Aerial views’ (stunning photography from above)

Twitter | ‘#TheDeep of #OurBluePlanet (approx scaled)’

Patreon | eBook: ‘Ecosystem of Fake (Vol. I) Explores the Historical Conditions For Bots to Flourish’

Creative Review | ‘Have you seen our building?’

Medium | ‘How Netflix works: the (hugely simplified) complex stuff that happens every time you hit Play’

BBC | ‘How the BBC News website has changed over the past 20 years’

Cleaning the Glass | ‘How to Get a Job in the NBA’

Colossal | ‘Museum Patrons Accidentally Matching Artworks Photographed by Stefan Draschan’

Twitter | ‘Here is Territory’s new BladeRunner 2049 UI reel featuring our screen graphics work on the film’

Blockbuilder | ‘The whole point of this project is to make it easier for you to make blocks. Blocks are the de-facto way of sharing visualizations and code samples in the d3.js community.’

Best of the visualisation web… October 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from October 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

Story curves | ‘Visualizing Nonlinear Narratives with Story Curves’

National Geographic | ‘Where to find the good life’

BBC | ‘The ultimate faces of global power’

QZ | ‘How do you draw a circle? We analyzed 100,000 drawings to show how culture shapes our instincts’

Washington Post | ‘Can we talk about the gender pay gap?’

Washington Post | ‘The Colin Kaepernick tracker: Is he better than your team’s quarterback?’

Google Trends | ‘How Diverse Are US Newsrooms?’

Storytelling With Data | ‘how you would visualize hurricanes’

Business Insider | ‘The economic and racial inequality problem in Baltimore exists in many US cities’ (From few years ago but another interesting deployment of multivariate map colouring)

New York Times | ‘Nothing Divides Voters Like Owning a Gun’

Tuteja | ‘Inequalities quipu’

Reuters | ‘Innovation bloom’

Density Design | ‘It’s not so ISIS’

Twitter | ‘Building age in Valencia, Spain.’

Twitter | ‘Buildings visualized based on their age show how #Madrid has grown in the last 200 years.’

Clome | ‘Machine Visions: Exploring Visual Motifs in Wes Anderson Films’

Tableau | ‘Formula E drivers seasons 2014-2016’

Reuters | Updated long-running ‘Nobel Laureates’ interactive

ABC | ‘Where can North Korea’s missiles reach?’

New York Times | ‘Northern California Fires Have Destroyed at Least 5,700 Buildings’

ThePudding | ‘Seeing Earth from Outer Space’

Significance | ‘The Great Migration: A Graphics Novel’

Imgur | ‘Sorting Algorithms Revisualized’

New York Times | ‘Trump’s Scandals, a List’

Bloomberg | ‘How China’s Top Leaders Came Into Power’

FiveThirtyEight | ‘The Worst Tweeter In Politics Isn’t Trump’

Archive | ‘Those who did not cross 2005-2015’

Truth & Beauty | ‘Peak Spotting: Data on rails’

Washington Post | ‘Where Republican senators stand on President Trump’

Axios | ‘Who Trump attacks the most on Twitter’

Tableau | ‘Constructor Success in Formula E Racing, First 3 Seasons’

BBC | ‘You draw the chart: How has life changed in 60 years?’

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

twosix labs | ‘6 Ways to Visualize Graphs’

Visual Cinnamon | ‘Lessons learned from data sketches: A presentation highlighting what we’ve learned’

Nothing In The Rule Book | ‘Creatives in Profile – Interview with Nicholas Rougeux’

Medium | ‘Data ITEMS: Exploring the Power and Depth of Soft Data for the Museum of Modern Art’

Source | ‘How (and Why) the Financial Times made The Uber Game’

Medium | ‘More Padding, Please! The power of white space in product design’

Programming Design Systems | ‘Perceptually uniform color spaces’

The Functional Art | ‘Uncertainty, graphicacy, and the power of statistics’

Medium | ‘Taking Word Clouds Apart: Alternative Designs for Word Clouds and Some Research-Based Guidelines’

Medium | ‘The 7 Kinds of Data Visualization People’

LinkedIn | ‘This Is How Data Kills Creativity’

Vis.Design | ‘An animated guide to frequency trails (AKA Joyplots)’

Giorgia Lupi | ‘Capturing the blend: A data driven brand identity for Hennessy V.S.O.P., with John Maeda and Kaki King.’

Beyond Words | ‘Cascade: A visualization used at the NTD Summit 2017 in Geneva, hosted by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.’

The nib | ‘Changing the Math on Gerrymandering: What would a proper Congressional district look like?’

QZ | ‘Data analytics have made the NBA unrecognizable’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

Excel Charts | ’12 ideas to become a competent data visualization thinker’

Cornell University Library | Paper: ‘Evaluating Cartogram Effectiveness’, by Sabrina Nusrat, Md. Jawaherul Alam, Stephen Kobourov

John Grimwade | ‘Notes from a Fernando Baptista ‘Sculpture and Infographics Workshop’ in Ohio’

The Information Lab | ‘Hackathon Diaries: Prospecting for Charity Donors’

Eager Eyes | The first of a typically excellent series of posts reviewing and headlining IEEE VIS 2017

Open Access VIS | Great resource ‘A collection of open access visualization research at the VIS 2017 conference.’

bl.ocks | Learn about the distortions of mapping projections via the distortions of a fella’s head

Medium | ‘Some notes on my collaboration with The Washington Post on the gender pay gap’

Scientific American | ‘The Evolution of a Scientific American Graphic: Pregnancy in Progress’

Vis.Academy | ‘Tutorials and classes prepared by the Uber visualization team’

Visual Cinnamon | ‘Creating the Scientific American “Baby Spike” visual: On circles, average and concentric circles’

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

YouTube | ‘#ProjectLincoln: Adobe MAX 2017 (Sneak Peeks)’

SocViz | New Book: ‘Data Visualization for Social Science: A practical introduction with R and ggplot2’ by Kieran Healy

EdWordle | ‘EdWordle is a tool for editing “word clouds” based on the Wordle.’

GitHub | ‘hexmapr: Turn geospatial polygons like states, counties or local authorities into regular or hexagonal grids automatically.’

Medium | ‘Introducing Vega-Lite 2.0’

Information is Beautiful Awards | Longlist of pieces submitted in to the 2017 Kantar Information is Beautiful Awards

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

Vox | ‘Watch Ryan Gosling rage over Avatar’s Papyrus font in SNL’s best sketch in ages’

Librarian Hats | ‘Data Viz Sing-Along!’

Medium | ‘Fantasy to Fact: Technology as a lens’

New Yorker | ‘Graphene may be the most remarkable substance ever discovered. But what’s it for?’ (Interesting anecdote about aluminium)

Under Consideration | ‘Thinking Too Far Outside of the Box’

Vice | ‘How ‘Blade Runner 2049′ Uses Technology to Highlight Class Inequality’

J R Schmidt | ‘Lego New York’ (and an amazing portfolio)

Signs | ’10 iconic logos. 156 Americans. 80 hours of drawing from memory.’

Twitter | ‘Here the steps we took and tools we used for our investigation mapping how the Las Vegas shooting unfolded’

FT | ‘PowerPoint: here’s how to keep your audience awake’

Best of the visualisation web… September 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from September 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

Guardian | ‘Access denied: wheelchair metro maps versus everyone else’s’

C82 | ‘Between Stations: Exploring the art of subway tracks’

Guardian | ‘A century of National Geographic infographics – in pictures’

Economist | ‘Many writers try to span America’s political divide’

Susie Lu | ‘Strong openers and late bloomers: Box office trends 2015 to August 2017’

FT | ‘A London Uber driver’s day on the road mapped out’

National Geographic | ‘[We] take a look at Cassini’s voyage and its greatest achievements’

Dear How To | One of my favourite project this year. ‘Each week for one year, each of us draws instructions on a blank postcard and sends it in turn to one or the other. The only rule is NO TEXT!’

Die Zeit | [Translated] ‘City, country, prejudice’

FT | ‘Germany’s election results in charts and maps’

SCMP | ‘Getting to grips with North Korea in 15 graphics’

Global Goals | ‘The Goalkeepers data report: The stories behind the data’

Twitter | ‘3 active hurricanes to map….I don’t know which way is up’ (clever map orientation)

The Pudding | ‘How far is too far? An analysis of driving times to abortion clinics in the US.’

FiveThirtyEight | ‘Hurricane Harvey’s Impact — And How It Compares To Other Storms’

Bloomberg | ‘Kushners’ China Deal Flop Was Part of Much Bigger Hunt for Cash’

Nesta | ‘Jobs in 2030: What skills will you need?’

Flowing Data | ‘Most Female and Male Occupations Since 1950’

Storybench | ‘Seven visualizations that tell the devastating story of the 2017 hurricane season’

New York Times | ‘The Cost of Hurricane Harvey: Only One Recent Storm Comes Close’

Guardian | ‘How death has changed over 100 years in Britain’

New York Times | ‘The world is projected to emit this much CO2 by 2100, exceeding our carbon budget three times over.’

Audubon | ‘Scientists Want to Start Forecasting When Certain Species Are Migrating Your Way’

DataPhys | ‘[Exploring] more human and emotional ways of communicating data’

Axios | ‘The insane news cycle of Trump’s presidency in 1 chart’

Elephant Trust | ‘The evolution of the Amboseli elephants population since 1972’

Ken Flerlage | ‘The State of Data Visualization’

Stories Behind a Line | ‘The Stories Behind a Line is a visual narrative of six asylum seekers’ routes.’

Tulp Interactive | ‘TravelTime is a data visualization based on open data from the Dutch National Data Warehouse for Traffic Information’

New York Times | ‘Watching Hurricanes Irma, Jose and Katia From 22,000 Miles Above Earth’

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

Medium | ‘655 Frustrations Doing Data Visualization’

Gabriela Plucinska | ‘Graphical abstracts’

Cartonerd | ‘Pointilist cartography’

Medium | ‘I like data-driven storytelling (I like loaded words)’

TED | ‘In this delightful, hilarious talk, data journalist Mona Chalabi shares handy tips to help question, interpret and truly understand what the numbers are saying’

Questions In Dataviz | ‘So, what’s the point?’

Medium | ‘Some notes on a collaboration with a Google News Lab: ‘How to fix a toilet and other things’’

Functional Art | ‘Low-tech visualization: How much space newspaper front pages used to cover hurricanes’

FiveThirtyEight | ‘The Media Has A Probability Problem’

Medium | ‘The next wave of data journalism?’

Google | ‘The state of data journalism in 2017’

Medium | ‘Thoughts on higher-level visualization libraries & the visualization industry’

Arnold Platon | ‘Who gets the UK’s 73 MEPS?’

Eager Eyes | ‘Vis Potpourri, September 2017’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

Medium | ‘Döner charts, eye roll gifs and word clouds — some things we learned visualizing Google Trends data around the German elections’

FT | ‘How to apply Marimekko to data’

Road To Larissa | ‘Hurricane How-To’

Quartz | ‘If you want to upgrade your data analysis skills, which programming language should you learn?’

Annual Reviews | Paper: ‘Risk and Uncertainty Communication: Annual Review of Statistics and Its Application’ by David Spiegelhalter

Eager Eyes | ‘Communicating Uncertainty When Lives Are on the Line’

Susie Lu | Design process notes to accompany the project listed above

MFViz | Amazing collection of open-source learning resources “to improve access to and understanding of programming languages”

The Functional Art | ‘In visualization, captions are as important as graphics themselves’

Medium | ‘Tools for Systems Thinkers: The 6 Fundamental Concepts of Systems Thinking’

Truth and Beauty | Really nice project write-up from Moritz

New York Times | ‘Announcing a New Monthly Feature: What’s Going On in This Graph?’

Eager Eyes | …linked to the above is this from Robert, ‘Visualization as a Field Is Still Invisible’

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

Mapbox | ‘A new kind of map: it’s about time’

After The Flood | ‘AtF Spark is a font that allows for the combination of text and visual data to show an idea and evidence in one headline’

Data Woj | ‘How can data visualisation help identify and communicate complex patterns?’

Guardian | ‘Much ado about nothing: ancient Indian text contains earliest zero symbol’

Medium | ‘Introducing Semiotic for Data Visualization’

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

University of Nottingham | ‘3D Face Reconstruction from a Single Image’

Nasa | ‘[This shows] the current state of the Deep Space network as established from available data updated every 5 seconds’

Flowing Data | ‘Everyday thresholds visualized in dramatic fashion’

Julian Oliver | ‘Wind energy used to mine cryptocurrency to fund climate research’

FiveThirtyEight | ‘How To Win A Nuclear Standoff’

Topic | ‘One Sky, by Women Who Draw – A collaborative project with almost 90 artists and one instruction: look up.’

New Statesman | ‘Two museums are having a fight on Twitter and it’s gloriously informative’

Best of the visualisation web… August 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from August 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

Washington Post | ‘What #eclipse2017 looked like across the country’

Medium | ‘041/342: Amp up! From psychedelic rock to minimalism – data viz experience.’

Visual Capitalist | ‘Animation: Comparing China vs. India Population Pyramids’

Washington Post | ‘Here’s how far you’re likely to get from America’s largest cities’

FT | ‘Bailout costs will be a burden for years’

Beautiful English | ‘Beautiful is the most common word translated to English with Google’

Morgenpost | ‘All 2559 direct candidates – who they are, what they stand for’

New York Times | ‘Alaska’s permafrost, is no longer permanent. It is starting to thaw’

Guardian | ‘Brexit talks: where are the negotiations up to?’ (Not a viz but shows value of good info design)

Scientific American | ‘Coming Soon? A Solar Eclipse Near You’

Dillon Marsh | ‘These images combine photography and computer generated elements in an effort to visualise the output of a mine’

Hindustan Times | ‘Every country’s fastest man in one race’

TheUpshot | ‘Good, Evil, Ugly, Beautiful: Help Us Make a ‘Game of Thrones’ Chart’

Washington Post | Some exceptional thematic mapping on show about Hurricane Harvey, beginning with ‘Flooding persists as Harvey downgraded to tropical depression’

Axios | …and this ‘Harvey’s energy toll’

Axios | …as well as ‘Map: Every storm that has hit Texas since 1960’

New York Times | …and ‘Maps: Tracking Harvey’s Destructive Path Through Texas and Louisiana’

Earth Observatory | …and this, predicting the likely best view of the total eclipse across the US based on then-projected clear skies

New York Times | …and finally ‘Thousands Cried for Help as Houston Flooded’

Bl.ocks | ‘Northern hemisphere sea ice extent: 1978 to 2017’ by Tom Shanley

The Science Bookstore | ‘Great Maps Department: Nationalities of Manhattan, 1894.’

Kultur Design | Wonderfully creative portfolio from the Kultur team, Polly and Mike

2q17 | ‘What was Germany looking for? Which terms were most frequently used in connection with the top candidates of the seven most searched parties on Google?’

Reuters | ‘North Korea visualised: A selection of data-driven stories from Reuters.’

ThePudding | ‘She Giggles, He Gallops: Analyzing gender tropes in film with screen direction from 2,000 scripts.’

Flickr | ‘Temperature anomalies arranged by country 1900 – 2016.’

FT | ‘Record football transfer deals within the realms of the rational’ (mainly the fascinating chart in the middle of the piece)

Washington Post | ‘The astonishing human potential wasted on commutes’

Gramener | ‘The Elvis Presley Jukebox’

John Grimwade Blog | ‘Size comparison: Side-by-sde visualisations’

Kickstarter | ‘The Golden Record: gold data visualisations from Voyager’

Fallen | The Shadow Peace is a web series that combines data-visualization and cinematic storytelling to explore the driving factors of war and peace’

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

Cartonerd | ‘Too much rain for a rainbow’

Vallandingham | ‘How Long Does it Take to (Quick) Draw a Dog?’

Medium | ‘Looking at the German election through Google Trends — an interview with Moritz Stefaner’ (about the ‘2Q17’ project, above)

Lisa Charlotte Rost | ‘My Why and How of Blogging’

John Grimwade Blog | ‘On the road: A less than serious review of highways signs’

Tableau | ‘The State of Data Education in 2016: How U.S. higher education responds to the data skills gap’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

Vallandingham | Talk: ‘Histograms to View Oodles of Doodles from Google’ (associated with article above)

Data Stories | Excellent episode 104 ‘Visualization Literacy in Elementary School with Basak Alper and Nathalie Riche’

AVIZ | ‘The Emerging Genre of Data Comics’

DataVizProject | ‘A website trying to present all relevant data visualizations, so you can find the right visualization and get inspired how to make them’

The Design Journal | Opinion piece: ‘Research in Graphic Design’ by Sue Walker

Journocode | ‘From the data to the story: A typical ddj workflow in R’

Source | ‘How We Made the Washington Post Eclipse-Scroller’

ESRI | ‘How-To: Missile Height Diagram’

Design Research Society | Paper: ‘Data Visualisation Does Political Things’, by Dr. Joanna Boehnert

Paint By Numbers | An oldie but I found it SO useful this month ‘A Rough Guide to Tableau Dashboard Actions’

R-Project | ‘The viridis color palettes’

Journal of Statistical Software | Paper: ‘Tidy Data’, by Hadley Wickham

Evergreen Data | ‘Visualizing Not Applicable or Missing Data’

New York Times | ‘What Music Do Americans Love the Most? 50 Detailed Fan Maps’

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

Rock the VizComm | ‘Charting the Chartists: A 2016 Survey of Data Visualization Professionals’

Twitter | Sarah Slobin’s curated an ‘open, evolving list of the female talent working with, studying and making dataviz’

ClearGraph | ‘ClearGraph joins Tableau’

Medium | ‘Introducing Semiotic for Data Visualization’

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

Medium | ‘Look (what you made me do): I illustrated 10 of my professional sins’

The Guardian | ‘Four UK news sources among top 10 most trusted in US – survey’

Twitter | ‘Map showing the most popular drinks company in each country’

Animade | It is so long ago I can’t remember specifically why I bookmarked this animated chilli dog but it is an animated chilli dog so that might be enough

CJR | ‘Q&A: Artist behind infamous New Yorker cartoon on the craft, his inspiration’

Guardian | ‘Why are there so few women in tech? The truth behind the Google memo’

Priceonomics | ‘Why Every Movie Looks Sort of Orange and Blue’

NRK beta | ‘With a quiz to comment, readers test their article comprehension’

Best of the visualisation web… July 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from July 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

SCMP | ‘Welcome to the South China Morning Post’s collection of infographics made for print. ‘

FT | …And here’s a place for all the FT’s visual journalism

Datavis Club | ‘A small visual exploration of the episodes and guests of the Data Stories podcast’

New York Times | ‘110 NFL Brains – A neuropathologist has examined the brains of 111 N.F.L. players – 110 were found to have C.T.E’

ABC | ‘Census 2016: This is Australia as 100 people’

Tableau | ‘Daylight duration’ (+checkout the rest of Yvan’s excellent gallery of Tableau work)

RP Online | ‘Our life as a commuter’ showing the in- and out-flow of commuters around the cities of Germany

New York Times | ‘Baseball’s Upward Trend Is Leaving Some Players Grounded’ (perfect use-case of a polar chart)

Core77 | ‘Clever Designs for Perpetual Calendars… that all have one glaring design flaw’

dwtkns | Speaking of portfolios, Derek Watkins’ really is something else

Trump in One Word | ‘Describe Donald Trump in one word’, love the map of where words were submitted from

Flowing Data | ‘Divorce and Occupation: Some jobs tend towards higher divorce rates. Some towards lower.’

Hindustan Times | ‘Find the perfect run or walk, anywhere in the world’

The Pudding | ‘Free Willy and Flipper by the Numbers’

SBS | ‘Interactive: How diverse is my suburb?’

New York Times | ‘It’s Not Your Imagination. Summers Are Getting Hotter.’

Ito World | ‘Airspace of the #TourdeFrance!’

FT | ‘London’s ‘regeneration’: the backdrop to Grenfell rage’ (featuring swarm plot action)

Penalty | ‘An Alternatve to Radars for Visualisng Football Data’ (featuring yet more swarm plot action)

YouTube | ‘Off the Staff: An experiment in visualizing notes from music scores.’ by Nicholas Rougeux

Washington Post | ‘Here’s what we know so far about Team Trump’s ties to Russian interests’

Vimeo | ‘Red Bull at Night x ByBORRE: The Sixth Sense – Case movie’ by Clever Franke

Twitter | ‘A Voronoi diagram of people enjoying the sun in Bryant Park.’

Earth Observatory | ‘Sea Level Rise Hits Home at NASA: Watching Waters Rise Right Outside the Front Door’

Morgenpost | ‘In the West Antarctic, a gigantic iceberg has broken down from the ice shelf… Move it on the map and transfer the dimensions to your area.’

Xocas | and here’s another similar piece ‘How big is the iceberg?’

Tableau | ‘Does your MP represent your views?’

Washington Post | ‘Why so many NHL and NBA teams have won back-to-back championships’

Flowing Data | ‘Summary Statistics Tell You Little About the Big Picture’

ProPublica | ‘The Immigration Effect: There’s a Way for President Trump to Boost the Economy by Four Percent, But He Probably Won’t Like It.’

The Upshot | ‘The Word Choices That Explain Why Jane Austen Endures’

Washington Post | ‘Here’s every total solar eclipse happening in your lifetime’

FiveThirtyEight | ‘Two Minutes Of Darkness With 20,000 Strangers’

New York Times | ‘Two Weeks on Ice in McMurdo Station, Antarctica’

Via Velox | ‘Visualizing GPS-tracked bike rides to better understand cycling behaviour’

Webkid | ‘Visualization of data along public transportation lines in Berlin’

Stamen | ‘Visualizing infant vaccination rates for the World Health Organization’

Quartz | ‘Watch this extorted money get lost in the expanse of the blockchain’

SB Nation | Don’t quite know how to describe it, just experience it

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

Medium | ‘Explaining the Gap: Visualizing One’s Predictions Improves Recall and Comprehension of Data’

Tin Lizzie | ‘Exploring Histograms, an essay by Aran Lunzer and Amelia McNamar’

Facets | ‘Know your data: Better data leads to better models.’

Medium | ‘Here’s what I learned from writing, coding and designing my own longform data-driven feature story’

Eager Eyes | ‘Joy Plots’

Questions in Data Viz | ‘Where is the joy?’ – more about Joy Plots, so hot right now

Intuity | ‘Lab Talk with Prof. Dr. Till Nagel: Meandering along the way’

CJR | ‘Q&A: ProPublica’s Lena Groeger on data visualization and writing about design’

DC Rainmaker | ‘Tour de France Behind the Scenes: How Dimension Data Rider Live Tracking Works’

Clearly and Simply | ‘Variations of Alternative Bullet Graphs in Excel’

Hackernoon | ‘You Say Data, I Say System’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

VizWiz | ‘A New Way to Visualize an Income Statement’

Data Camp | ‘DataCamp for the classroom, a new free plan for Academics.’

GIJN | ‘How To Create a Data Journalism Team’

TEDEd | ‘How to spot a misleading graph’, TEDEd talk by Lea Gaslowitz

Flowing Data | …and on the same note ‘How to Spot Visualization Lies’

Slides | ‘Interactive Maps created with d3.js’, presentation by Lucia Kocincova

Skillshare | ‘Programming Data Visualizations: A Coding Toolkit for Processing by Nicholas Felton’

Pixelmap | ‘Pixel Map Generator’

PythonPlot | ‘Python Plotting for Exploratory Data Analysis’

Google Drive | ‘R-Studio Tutorials’

Interaction Design Foundation | ‘Online UX design courses by experts. At a low, nonprofit-level fee.’

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

Rock the VizComm | ‘Charting the Chartists: A 2016 Survey of Data Visualization Professionals’

Amazon | New Book: ‘Data Visualization for Success: Interviews with 40 Experienced Designers’, by Steven Braun

John Grimwade | Profiling ‘InGraphics’ issue ten

The Noun Project | ‘Add icons without leaving your workflow’ – integration with office applications

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

Library Innovation Lab | ‘A Million Squandered: The “Million Dollar Homepage” as a Decaying Digital Artifact’

Comedy Central | ‘British Chainstores You Never Noticed In Sci-Fi Classics’

Wired | ‘Google Glass 2.0 is a startling second act’

Twitter | ‘This [a missing map] is ridiculous’

Livecodelab | ‘Livecodelab is a special secret place where you can make fancy “on-the-fly” 3d visuals and play awesomely offbeat (literally) sounds.’

Twitter | ‘Behold: The depecheplot #dataviz!’

hwkn | ‘New(er) York’

Medium | ‘On my second birthday we landed on the moon: A fifty year retrospective of trying to live with all of you on this goddamn planet.’

Ncase | ‘The evolution of trust’

Boredpanda | ‘This Cambodian Artist Is Taking Doodling To Another Level’

Time | ‘Quiz: See How Well You Can Draw All 50 States’

Behance | ‘Illustrations for Bird Handbook, a leaflet introducing birds of Tokyo.’

10 significant visualisation developments: January to June 2017

To mark each mid-year and end-of-year milestone I take a reflective glance over the previous 6-month period in the data visualisation field and compile a collection of some of the most significant developments. These are the main projects, events, new sites, trends, personalities and general observations that have struck me as being important to help further the development of this field or are things I simply liked a great deal. Here’s the full compilation of all my collections.

At the end of last year I published a collection for the last 6 months of 2016 and now I’d like to reflect on the first 6 months of 2017. I look forward to hearing from you with suggestions for the developments you believe have been most significant.

And so, as ever, in no particular order…

1. Hannah Fairfield, NYT Climate Editor

Hannah has been a celebrated graphics editor with the New York Times for over a decade but I share the belief of many that her appointment as the Times’ Climate Editor is the perfect choice to lead on what is surely the most important and urgent topic of our time. One could argue Hannah potentially holds one of the most influential positions in this industry. The quantity and quality of output (eg. Antarctic Dispatches, Impact on Southern Statues, 95 Degree Days) emerging already, mobilising the NYT’s existing graphic talent, is hugely encouraging and I wish her and her team continued success with this agenda.

2. Elijah Meeks

Elijah has been a particularly prominent voice over the past 6 months since his tweet questioning the state of the data visualisation industry. This was a timely, perhaps contrary view, that snapped a few of us out of any complacency and triggered a wide ranging discussion about the health and prospects of the data visualisation field. A huge survey designed by several contributors but initiated by Elijah took place and was followed up by his provocative articles ‘If Data Visualization is So Hot, Why Are People Leaving?‘ and ‘Strategic Innovation in Data Visualization Will Not Come From Tech‘. This triggered several further articles in response – some supportive, others more countering – from people like Moritz Stefaner, a collection of contributions curated by Eric Socolofsky, Lynn Cherny, and Jorge Camoes, to name but a few. Elijah went on to articulate his thoughts in two excellent Data Stories and PolicyViz podcast episodes. It is perhaps the most widespread, helicopter-viewed introspection of the data visualisation field since the landmark and laminate-worthy Information Visualization Manifesto of 2009 (!)

3. Hindustan Times

Though they have been established for much longer than the window of time covered by this collection of developments, it is only really during the past 6 months that I’ve become increasingly aware of the outstanding work being done by the Hindustan Times data team of journalists and developers (team members list of Twitter accounts). Not only is their portfolio of work demonstrating excellence in visualisation design, the topics covered represent contemporary societal, educational, and political issues that will be so relevant to the varied nature of their readership. It is wonderful to see the team making this information so accessible and engaging to consume.

4. Mona Chalabi

Mona hardly needs any introduction, she has been established for several years as a talented data journalist working for organisations like FiveThirtyEight and, currently, as the Data Editor for The Guardian US. Over the past few years Mona has created a influential niche in this field and I think this is the right time to acknowledge the significance of what she is achieving. This is not only through her role at The Guardian, particularly with her wonderfully creative hand-drawn data sketches, but also through her writing and presenting roles in video documentaries and on television (including an appearance on Channel 4’s ‘Alternative Election Night’ programme in the UK). Mona is breaking down more barriers in the pursuit of making data accessible to a mainstream audience.

5. Susie Lu’s D3-Annotation

A second inclusion for a member of the Netflix visualisation team, Susie’s release in March of her d3-annotation library very noticeably struck a chord with developers. I’m not a d3.js developer so I am speaking purely as an observer but everything I have seen and read about this development is that it is a super neat, super welcome solution to what is an under-appreciated and often neglected but vital aspect of good visualisation design. Incidentally, aside from checking out this library, you should also take time to look through all the other good stuff Susie has worked on.

6. Draw what you think

It is well over three years ago that I profiled a branch of interactive visualisation developments that I termed ‘participative‘, where you go beyond just interacting to taking part through contribution. Since then there has been a steady growth in examples where users are invited to draw their thoughts or estimates about a given subject, perhaps originating (in exposure terms) with the New York Times’ ‘You Draw It: How Family Income Predicts Children’s College Chances‘. A recently published paper, authored by Yea-Seul Kim, Katharina Reinecke, and Jessica Hulman of the University of Washington, titled ‘Explaining the Gap: Visualizing One’s Predictions Improves Recall and Comprehension of Data‘ (and accompanying article) confirms my hunch that these type of experiences can really enrich the learning process through directly challenging one’s perceptions about a subject. This offers significant empirical evidence that might now see the increased adoption of this technique going forward.

7. Periscopic ‘Emotions’

There’s not much to say here other than I loved this pair of complementary pieces by Periscopic to visualise the emotion of the 10 most recent inauguration Speeches and the ‘Emotional Highs and Lows of Donald Trump‘, deploying innovative methods for the capturing and categorising of video-based data, using clever visual representation approaches and then, in the final works, demonstrating such respect for the importance of transparency in describing the methods used and statements of accuracy. Wonderful projects from start to finish.

8. Statistical and Data Literacy

In the previous ‘10 most significant…‘ posting I noted there would need to be a reaction to the apparent deficit that existed in trust and literacy with numbers, data, or statistics (how ever you wish to box it), especially in the aftermath of the US election and the UK’s EU referendum. Over the past 6 months I have seen a number of examples of people or groups looking to help make relevant resources and knowledge more widely accessible from the ‘Calling Bullshit‘ and ‘Seeing Theory‘ sites, through Alberto Cairo’s ‘Visual Trumpery‘ lecture tour, and to articles like ‘How to Spot Visualization Lies‘ from Nathan Yau or ‘Does Your Data Visualization Say What You Think It Says?‘ by Martha Kang, are all important contributors to this aim. But just the start, of course.

9. Statics don’t exist

I found this article by Dominikus Baur to be really compelling and quite thought-provoking. I began reading it expecting to disagree profoundly but by the end I was genuinely reconsidering my understanding of what it is to interact with a visualisation work. I continue to think that the reader – rather than maker – side of visualisation literacy is still under-researched and articles like this are really important to stimulate fresh thinking in the relationship between a reader and a visualisation work.

10. Gifs

Many of you will have seen Ed Hawkins’ animated radial plot of temperature changes that went viral last year. This was an example of how important the gif has now become to accompany, display or indeed market the publishing of a new visualisation work. Datagifs are certainly not new in 2017, Lena Groeger has been speaking about and collecting examples of them for a few years at least, but they have now become a quite ubiquitous and, I would concede, appealing option to provide a taster or to package up your visual work.

Special mentions…

Here are the other highlights or notable developments from the first half of 2017 that deserve a special mention:

Hans Rosling | We sadly lost Professor Rosling earlier in the year but it is quite clear that the inspiration and legacy of his work will continue to echo in significance for generations to come.

Forma Fluens | A fascinating project exploring ‘abstraction, simultaneity and symbolization in drawings’.

Axios Visuals | This is a one-to-watch inclusion. Axios is relatively new news and information website founded by several former members of Politico and, given the appointments made to the visuals team, I anticipate increasing growth in prominence to build on a very solid first few months.

Conflict Urbanism | An excellent project mapping and visualising 30 years of crimes in Colombia in hopes of better understanding the patterns and ramifications of the conflict.

Cracking the Mystery of Egg Shape | Love the synthesis of imagery, animation and visual analysis in this investigation in to why egg shapes are so different from one bird to the next.

Kim Rees at Capital One | The recruiting of Kim by Capital one was a huge coup and continues a recent trend of commercial organisations appointing or acquiring visualisation designers.

Best of the visualisation web… June 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from June 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

The Pudding | ‘A Timeline of Each Year’s Top-200 Grossing Films, 1966 – 2016’

Food and Water Watch | ‘Art Amplifies Activism Behind the Dakota Access Pipeline’

Science | ‘Cracking the mystery of the egg shape’. Eggxellent piece.

David Bihanic | ‘“Data Shapes” is an experimental project that introduces a realtime way to visualize the global flow of public data’

Dataphys | ‘EuroGums: Edible Population Pyramids’

Forma Fluens | ‘Abstraction, simultaneity and symbolization in drawings.’

New York Times | ‘How Britain Voted’

Twitter | Superb sequence of Premier League analysis by John Burn-Murdoch

Behance | ‘Visualising Futuristic Technology for National Geographic Channel’s Year Million ‘

Quartz | ‘Map: Donald Trump’s “mean, mean, mean” health care bill is meanest to his most crucial voters’

National Geographic | ‘From Blood-Soaked Sand to Retractable Roofs: A History of Stadiums’

New York Times | ‘Trump’s Lies’

FT | ‘Climate change pushes ominous clouds over southern US’

Washington Post | ‘Only two countries aren’t part of the Paris climate agreement. The U.S. will be the third.’

Treepedia | ‘Exploring the Green Canopy in cities around the world’

Visual Athlete | ‘Create beautiful art using sports data’

Vox | ‘We tracked the Trump scandals on right-wing news sites. Here’s how they covered it.’

The Big Book of Dashboards | A selection of downloadable dashboards profiled in the book

Tableau | ‘The Kakapo’

Nexo | ‘The rhythm and style of different Brazilian literary works’ [Translated]

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

FT | ‘Data visualisation: it is not all about technology’

Periscopic | ‘Visualizing Spanish Migration: A Case Study for Data Exploration at Periscopic’

Vencore | ’10:30 AM | The most important weather forecast of all-time: D-DAY, June 6, 1944*’

Perceptual Edge | ‘The DataVis Jitterbug: Let’s Improve an Old Dance’

Medium | ‘Why you should be prototyping’

Tableau Public | ‘Vizzes from Around the World: Italy’s Got Talent!’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

ThePudding | ‘How to implement scrollytelling with six different libraries’

IBCS | ‘The International Business Communication Standards (IBCS or IBCS Standards) are practical proposals for the design of reports and presentations’

Roman Klinger | Paper: ‘Investigating the Relationship between Literary Genres and Emotional Plot Development’ by Evgeny Kim, Sebastian Padó and Roman Klinger

Stardust | ‘Stardust: GPU-based Visualization Library’

JMP | ‘Introducing packed bars, a new chart form’

UBC | Talk slides: ‘Data Visualization Pitfalls to Avoid’ by Tamara Munzner

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

Rock the VizComm | ‘Charting the Chartists: A 2016 Survey of Data Visualization Professionals’

Data Stories | ‘100 | Data Stories 100!!!’ (Congratulations to Mo and Enrico!)

Mapbox | ‘Welcome to Cartogram: Make a map style by dropping an image on the map’

Data Journalism Awards | Announcing the winners for the Data Journalism Awards 2017

Amazon | New book: ‘Data Visualization for Success: Interviews with 40 Experienced Designers’ by Steven Braun

Enigma Public | ‘Welcome to Enigma Public, the world’s broadest collection of public data. Take a tour to see everything you can do in the Public platform.’

O’Reilly | New book: ‘Interactive Data Visualization for the Web, 2nd Edition: An Introduction to Designing with D3’ by Scott Murray

Dunod | New book: ‘Manuel de datavisualisation’, by Jean-Marie Lagnel [French]

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

Archive | ‘Apollo mission 17 lunar photography index maps’

Twitter | ‘The mobile web in 2017’

Calligraphr | ‘Transform your handwriting or calligraphy into a font!’

Independent | From 2015 but I only learnt about it recently, the fascinating story of the China ‘social credit’ system to rate each citizen’s trustworthiness

Twitter | ‘One design firm’s jargon-free contract: “Time is money. More time is more money”‘

New York Times | ‘The Little-Known Statistician Who Taught Us to Measure Teachers’

Best of the visualisation web… May 2017

At the end of each month I pull together a collection of links to some of the most relevant, interesting or thought-provoking web content I’ve come across during the previous month. Here’s the latest collection from May 2017.

Visualisations & Infographics

Includes static and interactive visualisation examples, infographics and galleries/collections of relevant imagery.

Vizualism | ’10 years after the credit crisis, stock market still red’ – Lovely horizon chart action from frédérik

Moonglow | ‘The 2002 Australian Total Solar Eclipse’ – really nice mosaic map

Data Sketches | ‘A Breathing Earth: 50.000 circles moving through a year of data on planetary vegetation health’

Washington Post | ‘A month of breaking news alerts, visualized’

Atlas for the End of the World | ‘The Atlas for the End of the World audits the status of land use and urbanization in the most critically endangered bioregions on Earth’

Dylan Moriarty | ‘Foggy spaces’

Pudding | ‘Are Pop Lyrics Getting More Repetitive?’

New York Times | ‘As Arctic Ice Vanishes, New Shipping Routes Open’

WSJ | ‘Beat the Federal Reserve: See how changes in prices of goods and services influence inflation’

Washington Post | ‘Appalachia comes up small in era of giant coal mines’

Centre for Spatial Research | ‘Conflict Urbanism: Colombia maps and visualizes these crimes in hopes of better understanding the patterns and ramifications of the Colombian conflict’

Seattle Collisions | Nice project in itself but also a nice back story of seizing the chance to visualise important data that was not previously being done so

New York Times | ‘Did the Turkish President’s Security Detail Attack Protesters in Washington?’ – love the annotated video work

Morgenpost | ’25 years ago, two of Germany became one. How united are we today? We have visited 25 places where German unity has a very special significance’ [Translated]

DataPhys | ‘EuroGums: Edible Population Pyramids’

Twitter | ‘Previous occupations held by MPs (since the 1950s).’

Font Map | ‘Using artificial intelligence to surface new relationships across (750) fonts’

FT | ‘French election results: Macron’s victory in charts’

New York Times | ‘How Abnormal Was Comey’s Firing? Experts Weigh In’

Twitter | The final animated gif by John Burn-Murdoch of the Premier League league table projections across the season

New York Times | ‘LeBron James Scores 5,995th Playoff Point, Taking the Record From Michael Jordan’

C82 | ‘Making of Color Palettes of The New Yorker’

Bloomberg | ‘How a Melting Arctic Changes Everything’

New York Times | ‘Antarctic Dispatches’

The Economist | Nice comet chart looking at the relative young age of Macron as French president

Axios | ‘The Emoji States of America’

io9 | ‘This Animated Field Guide To North American Butterflies Is Mesmerizing’

Articles

The emphasis on these items is that they are less about visualisation images and are more article-focused, so includes discussion, discourse, interviews and videos

Eager Eyes | ‘Averages Are Metadata’

The Economist | ‘Data is giving rise to a new economy’

Spotify | ‘Iconic Playlists: What Emoji Say About Music’

Cambridge Intelligence | ‘Making sense of Cyber threats with graph technologies’

Our Origins | Nice interview with Lena Groeger ‘Developer, designer, and journalist at ProPublica’

Sense of Info Design | ‘The Value of Information Design Expertise’

John Grimwade | ‘Sketching Infographics’

Places Journal | ‘Two artists explore spy satellite calibration markers in the desert — and trace the satellites in the sky today.’

Prototypr | ‘Static visualizations do not exist’

Storytelling With Data | Nice piece from Cole about the role of and making-of the bullet chart

The Functional Art | ‘The importance of writing making-of articles in visualizatio’

DataBlick | ‘To Animate or Not To Animate’

Storybench | ‘What we learned from three years of interviews with data journalists, web developers and interactive editors at leading digital newsrooms’

Learning & Development

These links cover presentations, tutorials, academic papers, development opportunities, case-studies, how-tos etc.

Journal of Vision | Paper: ‘Four types of ensemble coding in data visualizations’ by Danielle Albers Szafir, Steve Haroz, Michael Gleicher, & Steven Franconeri

ArcGIS Blog | ‘World Happiness Report’ – nice design process narrative from John Nelson

Jagoda Walny | ‘Thinking with sketches for information visualization’

Maarten Lambrechts | ‘Making-of: The Eurosearch Song Contest’

OpenVis Conf | What a wonderful way to present access to the conference talk videos and transcripts

Projection Wizard | I’ve probably shared before but worth including again, does what it says on the tin

Sage Journals | Paper: ‘Visual Geolocations. Repurposing online data to design alternative views’ by Gabriele Colombo, Paolo Ciuccarelli, & Michele Mauri

Autodesk Research | ‘Same Stats, Different Graphs: Generating Datasets with Varied Appearance and Identical Statistics through Simulated Annealing’

Medium | ‘The Hitchhiker’s Guide to d3.js’

Lisa Charlotte Rost | ‘Why You Don’t Believe In Facts, And How To Fix It’

Subject News

Includes announcements within the field, brand new/new-to-me sites, new books and generally interesting developments.

Rock the VizComm | ‘Charting the Chartists: A 2016 Survey of Data Visualization Professionals’

The Data Duo | ‘This project is about data, improving our skills, and getting to know each other. We will do this by tracking different themed data about ourselves, but the twist is we will visualize each other’s data.’

Information is Beautiful Awards | Announcing the ‘2017 Awards Categories’

Venture Beat | ‘Google launches Data GIF Maker to help storytellers convey information through animations’

YouTube | ‘The Data School – What it’s all about’

PR Newswire | ‘Stamen Design Wins Prestigious Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum’s 2017 National Design Award For Interaction Design’

Sundries

Any other items that may or may not be directly linked to data visualisation but might have a data/technology focus or just seem worthy of sharing

Ritsumeikan University | A collection of brain-aching colour illusions

Toptal | ‘Sorting Algorithms Animations’

Design Taxi | ‘How Your Favorite Movie Studio Logos Were Brought To Life’

Storm Highway | ‘Dodge City, Kansas tornado life cycle panoramas’

GitHub | ‘This R package is mainly a repository for complete soccer datasets, along with some built-in functions for analyzing parts of the data’

Learning Music | ‘In these lessons, you’ll learn the basics of music making. No prior experience or equipment is required; you’ll do everything right here in your browser.’

Noisey | ‘How and Why Has “Mr Brightside” Never Left the UK Charts?’

The Mind Circle | ‘How Sensitive Is Your OCD Radar?’

YouTube | ‘Mike Monteiro – How to Fight Fascism’

Quick, Draw | ‘What do 50 million drawings look like?’